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Realistic Weathering by Mother Nature.

Hi Everyone
I went out today and photographed some of Mother Nature work I hope that is will be use full to some of you.
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Comments

  • Carl,

    I have meant to take pictures of structures like this one hundred times and never did it. I like what you have posted and look forward to more.

    Mitch
  • Wow Carl, just fantastic! Wonderful stuff. Thank you for posting. There is so much to study and learn from...
  • Those are great. I'd love to model a falling down barn. I imagine it would be quite hard to make it look natural.
  • Great thread here Carl, I have a whole series of pictures I took out in Arizona this summer. I'll post couple now to keep this thing going.

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    This next one is near some property I own is SE Ohio:

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  • Wow! Great stuff, guys
    Thank you!
  • Check out the photography of Shaun O'Boyle.
    new.oboylephoto.com/portfolio
    An amazing collection of stunning photography.
    ed
  • Pictures of the Tahawus Mine in Tahawus, N. Y. are inspiring.
  • Carl, thanks for the great photos, there is a lot to think about. I have been trying to get that colour combination to work but not been able to. I hope Ken will divulge his formula for the result he has shown for his Blue Sky project...David
  • Great pictures Carl. Very interesting. Lots a knots, buckled wood, and quite a bit of black in the boards. Just wonderful information.

    Geezerbill
  • These are good pictures of abandoned buildings and the effects of mother nature and various disrepair. But, Brett's kits as I have seen them are buildings still being used for some business, etc. and maybe some disrepair but not the extent shown in these photo's. Personally, I like weathering not so drastic for buildings that are still in some kind of use.
  • These are very good photos Carl, thanks. Awful lot to glean from them. Keep my eye busy for some time.

  • Thank's Leonard.
  • Carl, I really like the pictures of the old barn....I have some old 1860 barn wood I installed on a few wall's in my basement when our house was built 4 years ago was one of the first thing's I did.
  • I visited Biltmore over the weekend and took some interesting reference photos. First set is of the roof at the stables. It has the nice purple/red rust that looks like the O'Neills roof. It also included some of the remnants of green paint that I was trying to accomplish on my build.

    Next is a closeup of a Fordson tractor motor.

    Last is the inside of the blacksmith shop. Note the drill press...it's the same one that is in the SWSM machine shop kit. I also liked the grinder with the seat. I want to build one of these.

    Last is just for fun. There was a garden railroad with some impressive truss bridges.

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  • That stable roof pictured above is awesome. Hopefully someone in this group can come up with a way to duplicate this way of aging (effect) a steel roof over a previously painted roof.

    http://www.craftsmankituniversity.com/vanforum/uploads/imageupload/708/18RJYBHGUY0N.jpg

    I really like the single and double raised ribs presented on that roof. Was this type of roof unique to the Biltmore stables? I don't recall ever seeing this type of raised rib panel roof before, let alone seeing it modeled. Was it a way to overlap roof panels, make them more rigid and better lock them in place as well as create a better waterproofing system? Was this type of steel roof common in that area or was it even more widespread across other regions?

    Later, Dave S. Tucson, AZ
  • Very nice. Thank you.
    ed
  • Great reference photos....thanks for taking the time to share them
    Terry
  • edited September 2018
    Was visiting West Michigan this week and found an old station with a great weathered loading dock
    Terry
    Photos won’t load from my iPhone....will upload tomorrow from my laptop
  • So these are the photos I was having trouble uploading...this is an old depot in Whitehall Michigan which is now a Chamber of Commerce tourist office. The building is being maintained and I think I'll scratch build it but the loading dock weathering is what really caught my eye...the deterioration of the heavy timber is what fascinated meIMG_4651a
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  • Nice photos Terry, Thanks for taking the time to get these posted?

    Mark
  • Terry,

    I can't agree more with what Mark has said except to add that last photo is especially informative and instructional at the same time. It is a great example of some fairly extreme weathering that not only features a knot but the wood grain pattern around it and the deep check around the bolt.

    The first two photos of the "end" of the large 10' X 10" beam timber are a feature that I would like to be able to duplicate for a dock. That is a feature that I have yet to see "Dr. Grunge", Ken Karns, show us in one of his builds.

    The weathering of the field of regular 2" X 6" deck boards I think most of us already know how to approximate/duplicate.

    So I too would like to add my thanks for your keeping an eye open for interesting and informative material for us to learn from and taking the time to get it posted.

    Later, Dave S. Tucson, AZ
  • edited September 2018
    i wonder if you could replicate that deteriorating metal roofing by priming it with a green instead of a gray, and then work chalks around til you get the desired effect? would that work? maybe you could remove chalk in desired areas with a rubber eraser? i'm just thinkin' here....
  • Kevin,

    Interesting ideas about weathering the roof. I hope we get some additional ideas to try.

    http://www.craftsmankituniversity.com/vanforum/uploads/imageupload/708/18RJYBHGUY0N.jpg

    I was wondering if anybody made copper roofing material with a raised rib to try to age to the green color copper gets after exposure to the elements. I've read on other forums about ways to accelerate the aged patina look of copper that can't be explained on this forum. That might also be an interesting base upon which to proceed with various shades of rust colors. Just thinkin' out loud.

    Later, Dave S. Tucson, AZ
  • Kevin, That does work.
  • I was out for a hike with the grandsons this afternoon in the Blue Ridge Mtns (SW Virginia) and came across some ashlar masonry covered in moss...also some tree stumps with moss, etc....
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  • Love the corrugated skirting around the dock. Have to find a way to incorporate it into a diorama. Also the color and texture of the building siding is interesting. Can't remember where I found these next 2 photos but like them.
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  • Shows scraping behind a sliding barn door. I took these photos at a pumpkin farm in WI.
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    My inspiration for rusted corrugated roofing. Just the right amount of rust to show use.
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  • My inspiration for the color of rusted machinery. I took these at the Georgetown Loop RR.
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  • Some great material here. I want to add fungi to a tree now.
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