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SierraWest O scale Sawmill Project ..... Kit 308

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Comments

  • Yep, I'm still kickin', thanks Jerry.

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    Karl.A
  • edited October 2013
    Thanks Joel, they really are amazing, and whats even more amazing is that I have only had to file away one small casting mark in the whole process, everything has fit perfectly.

    I have used epoxy throughout all of the machinery for metal-metal and metal-wood. I will admit however that I got lazy on this one and used some superglue for the wheels and shafts.

    Time to glue everything together. Only the main frame is epoxied at this point, everything else is just 'sitting' in place.

    Karl.A
  • Got this one pretty much ready to go. As with all the others final weathering and touch up will happen after the install.

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    On to the last one which will be the cut-off saw.

    Karl.A
  • Hey Karl, The wizard at work...love the subdued green color you're working with even without final weathering it looks fantastic. Machinery design and fabrication is unreal...Noticed your parts bins with the SierraWest labels...sweet! Ken
  • Damn, that's some nice work Karl.
    Yet again, the bar has been raised!
  • Oh man, that is real nice on the eye! Amazing. I love the paint job too and it looks like you applied it with a brush after at least partial assembly? There is nothing like these kits which comes even close...
    On the issue of epoxy- I find sometimes it's thickness is an issue, particularly in visible locations where it might goosh out a bit. Is there such a thing as thin epoxy in the same manner as ACC?
  • edited October 2013
    Thanks very much for the kind words Ken, Bill and James.

    The green is bright "Christmas Green" from Apple Barrel craft paints Ken. I like it for machinery and bottles, it dulls down nicely with some chalks..

    The bar has been raised ??? Holy cow, I hope they raised the stools too. This could be disastrous, I'm only 5'9" !!

    Indeed James, the main body was assembled and then painted, once dry the rest of the construction continued.

    If you very slightly warm the two parts of the epoxy in the bottles before pouring and mixing they will become thinner James, more watery. I haven't done this for several years so I'm not sure if it effects curing time. 5-10 secs in the microwave is what I vaguely recall doing.

    If you get a little ooze between parts I have learnt from Brett that if you let it dry to a rubbery consistency it is fairly easy to peel off the excess with a toothpick and leave no residue.

    We all seem to use a little 'too much' glue sometimes, just to make sure it holds well I guess, that's my excuse anyway, ha.

    Moved onto the Mill Engine and Boiler, first layer of paint on the boiler body, a little bit further on the engine itself.

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    Karl.A
  • Nice Karl. Your usual up to expectations.

    First coat on boiler Black spray paint???

    Jerry
  • edited October 2013
    Thanks Jerry,
    yep, 99c flat black rattle can . Dry brushed with silver. Chalks will follow.

    Karl.A
  • Preliminary chalking complete on the boiler, final touches after the install.

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    Karl.A
  • Hi Karl,
    The machinery and boiler looks fantastic, The wear marks on the machinery look very realistic and placed just were you expect them and the boiler weathering is superb!
    Jim
  • Awesomely awesome!! The boiler and the mill engine are amazing. Love the dusting on the boiler. Thanks for tips on the epoxy...
  • This is amazing Karl, kind of makes me want to switch to O, after I've finished the Shipyard ... of course. BTW, is that a mirror you're working on ... or a piece of glass with black materal under it...?

    Paul
  • Hi Karl: Excellent work on all the machinery but the weathering on the boiler is just incredible. When I built mine a couple of years ago, I really blew it- too much rust. I was able to recover, but doesn't look anything like your work. WOW....Joe CCCModOn30
  • Thanks for all the great comments Jim, James, Paul and Joe. I'm really happy with the way the boiler came out.

    Paul, I have a large piece of glass inset into my work bench, which theoretically gives me lots of workspace, I somehow always end up working in a 6" area surrounded by clutter.
    Bigger desk = Bigger mess.

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    I got the cut-off saw assembled yesterday. A most enjoyable project. still need to add the belt and dull down the green in a place or two.

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    Karl.A
  • Karl Boiler looks awesome.

    Nice clean work area to display another masterpiece of machinery.

    Jerry
  • Hi Karl.

    Just catching up after some time away. Wow what a visual feast for the eyes over the last few pages. Stunning stuff.
  • Hi Karl.

    Just catching up after some time away. Wow what a visual feast for the eyes over the last few pages. Stunning stuff.
  • Karl, fantastic work.......I know Bill asked sometime ago what material you are using for the belts,never did see the answer......Maybe I'm blind....could you repost the answer

    Thanks


    Scott
  • Thanks very much for the great posts Jerry, Wes, Wes, and Scott, really nice to read on my return to the thread.

    I decided to take the plunge and have started adding the next layer of weathering to the machinery, namely sawdust.

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    Still need to add a final layer of super fine dust on top and do a little clean up on some areas such as can be seen below on the levers.

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    Karl.A
  • Very cool. Is the sawdust fixed at all? Sawdust always looks great in sawmill dioramas.

    Re: belts- I believe people were talking about various coated papers or mylar as Mr. Doan uses (more durable). I got my hands on some old WSM and CHB machinery kits and the belts appear to be a thin Mylar but haven't opened the bags yet. The instructions say to buff or polish them. As with any paper, if used, I presume one should use archival or acid free paper...
  • I meant vellum not Mylar
  • edited November 2013
    I believe Brett uses Tyvek.

    Karl nice job with the sawdust. Very realistic looking.
    Are you going to do sound will the mill?? Maybe even a little smell of the dust blowing around. I know you can do it.

    Jerry
  • edited November 2013
    Thanks James and Jerry, good to read your comments.

    Brett has used Tyvek in the past as Jerry says. My machinery shown here uses frosted Mylar spray painted with Rustoleum Camo paint colour Earth brown.

    Indeed, the sounds and the smell are already figured out Jerry.

    Karl.A
  • Thanks all on the belt material......Karl,.saw dust looks great....keep it coming

    Scott
  • Hi Karl,
    Very nice touch with the sawdust. I am really looking foward to the sawmill build.
    I really appreciate the amount of time you put into posting and commenting. I still think Brett and yourself need to do a dvd or book on techniques. Hopefully I will someday be able to attend a class at the Modeling Expo.
    Jim
  • Thanks Jim, much appreciated.
    DVD's hmmmmm.... need some more hours in the day first.

    Karl.A
  • I like the hmmmm.... may be it could turn into YESSSS!!
    Jim
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