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How about those chalk sticks?

edited July 2011 in Tools and Supplies
You all know how much I love working with chalk sticks....
Here is some general information about my favorite brand... Rembrandt:

The numeration/color system is as follow:
The raw color is numbered XXX.3 - the 3 indicates a raw color and the XXX indicates the color
If the number after the dot in higher than 3 it is a shade - that is it has has black added and the higher the number, the darker the shade. If the number after the dot is smaller than 3 it is a tint - that is is has white added.

The Rembrandt chalk sticks do not contain clay binders and fillers - that's why they work so much better than weathering powders. A list of basic colors follows below...

Comments

  • Very well explained Brett. I know there are other chalks but I find these to be perfect as far as how hard they are. What I mean is they are not so hard that they don't powder and blend well and not so soft that they smudge.
    Kevin
  • Thanks Brett & Kevin - This was my first time using
    Rembrandt chalks for weathering.....I don't know how
    I got by without them before. I like them because I can
    change color, fade in or out and add texture at will.....
    I bought all the colors that were suggested in the WCS kit
    and have since used them on wooden box cars & reefers
    for the WL&M co. Thanks again.....
    Kevin - I lost the link to your how-to's - can ya send it to me?
  • I've found a god source of inexpensive chalk for large applications. Chalk line chalk, powders available in any hardware store comes in some basic colors, red, black, and white. I've mixed the black and white to get a nice gray. The red works well over flat black or grimy black as a convincing rust. Because of its intended use it has good adhesive properties. I also use the artists pastels rubbed on a piece of sandpaper and then brushed on for some of the more subtle shadings.
  • Well that is a new one for me!!! I want to remind everyone that chalk sticks are inexpensive and come in every color and hardness we could ever want. Other materials like camdcm mentions may contain binders, fillers, and worse of all acids and lignins. These materials change over time especially when mixed with other agents like the paint and glue we use at time of construction. You might come back three years later to find wierd stains around the area they were used upon. I ALWAYS suggest to use only high quality artist brand chalk sticks. I have for over 15 years and they work and the weathering lasts...
  • If you don't have time to post a list of colors here is there any set (or combination) of kit instructions that would come closest to being complete?
  • here is a basic listing of Rembrandt Colors:

    Brown Family For Wood:
    • Raw Umber — 408.3, 408.5, 408.9
    • Burnt Umber — 409.3 and 409.9
    • Raw Sienna — 234.3

    Orange/Red Family For Rust:
    • Gold Ochre — 231.5
    • Burnt Sienna — 411.3 and 411.5
    • Light Orange — 236.7
    • Permanent Red — 370.3

    Black, White, Grey:
    • Black — 700.5
    • White — 100.5
    • Warm Grey — 704.7
    • Cool Grey — 727.7
    • Neutral Grey — 704.8
  • This is awesome! Printing it out & taking it with me to the local Art Supply Store! Thanks, Brett!
  • If your local shop doesn't have them go online to DickBlick.

    I couldn't agree more, thanks to Brett for introducing this technique to me. I can't believe how much more flexible this is compared to paint or pigment powders. After doing a couple of structures now I have learned a couple of lessons that I will pass on. Maybe others have found the same but here they are.

    When doing a structure, write down on a post-it what colors used in sequence so it can be reproduced for touchup. Put the post-it in the instruction manual and keep it there.

    Keep a small box on the table with the colors currently being used and only those colors in that box.

    Work on a smooth glass surface. A glass cutting board is nice, but if there is a texture then turn it over.

    Don't clean up the excess chalk immediately. When you cut some wood dip a brush in straight alcohol, swirl it around in the chalk on the glass and touch up the cut. The dry chalk can also be brushed onto a wall to tone down other weathering attempts.

    A light sanding with 220 grit paper gives a good highlight effect. It can be done on a wall or on boards individually.

    Once all the chalks are applied and everything is dry, brush lightly with a wire brush to clean out the woodgrain. then brush again with a plastic or stiff paint brush.

    There are probably others but this is all for now.
  • admin said:

    here is a basic listing of Rembrandt Colors:

    Brown Family For Wood:
    • Raw Umber — 408.3, 408.5, 408.9
    • Burnt Umber — 409.3 and 409.9
    • Raw Sienna — 234.3

    Orange/Red Family For Rust:
    • Gold Ochre — 231.5
    • Burnt Sienna — 411.3 and 411.5
    • Light Orange — 236.7
    • Permanent Red — 370.3

    Black, White, Grey:
    • Black — 700.5
    • White — 100.5
    • Warm Grey — 704.7
    • Cool Grey — 727.7
    • Neutral Grey — 704.8

  • edited May 13
    Thanks for the info...seems like I've seen numbers like this on other products...is this an industry standard for coordinating color matches between manufacturers rather than being proprietary to Rembrandt?

    Terry
  • Out here in Tucson, Arizona Art Supply has a full display and range of the Rembrandt chalks. When I go to the shop and buy different shades and colors the clerks (usually University of Arizona art students) ask me what I use them for. When I tell and show them how I color scale lumber with the chalks they are amazed that model railroaders are into such stuff.

    Later, Dave S. Tucson, AZ
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