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Yet another Oneill's kit.... my first HO SW build.

I've already owned this kit for almost a year, but being buried in other projects kept me from starting. I got some space cleared and finally opened up this amazing kit. Of course I did the obligatory Oooh's and Aaaah's (even though I did that when I first received this kit), I felt a need to re-familiarize myself with the manual and marvel at all the pieces and parts again.

Now it's on to business, I may not get as much done, as fast as some of you guys, but I opened up the first bag and started graining, and staining the first set of boards for the main walls. I haven't painted them just yet, and thought I would show my progress.

I like the colorization that I achieved, the only thing I see that I think needs more work, is that none of the knot holes that I put in showed up in the staining process. I think the reason being is that the compass that I used might have been too sharp to make a big enough hole. I will come around and try to fix it with something a little more blunt, and carefully adding a drop of A I solution to highlight them.

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Of course, at any time I am open to hints, tips, tricks, suggestions, critics etc..... and I will update this as I go.
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Comments

  • I look forward to watching your progress...I too am working on my first SWSM kit...the Railroad Camp Anniversary kit....I also have had trouble with knot holes...or should I say 'not' holes and the graining of the wood....I scrub and scrub with the wire brush till my arm is sore and with very little result...nothing like the graining I see on so many of the photos I see here...
  • Great start Mike! Off and running... A small burnishing tool from the craft store scrapbook section will make wonderful impressions in the wood to simulate a knot. Additional detail surrounding the impression may be added as desired. This is in the manual with more information.
  • I look forward to watching your progress...I too am working on my first SWSM kit...the Railroad Camp Anniversary kit....I also have had trouble with knot holes...or should I say 'not' holes and the graining of the wood....I scrub and scrub with the wire brush till my arm is sore and with very little result...nothing like the graining I see on so many of the photos I see here...

    You most likely have a brush with bristles that are too soft and flexible. Check the hardware store in the cleaning, plumbing, and welding supply sections for different brushes and select those with stiff bristles. The right brush will make incredibly fast work of the grain!

  • edited January 11
    I got a nifty little tool from micro mark on the suggestion from someone else's post here on the forum, but I can't remember who... they have an adjustable length one that you can change the length of the bristles which affect the hardness. I really like it

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    I typically let the bristles stick out about 1/16 of an inch or just a little longer, and get fairly rapid results.
  • Thanks...just ordered from Amazon Prime... 8.72
  • Thanks...just ordered from Amazon Prime... 8.72


    What is the item number or description on Amazon I can't find it? Thanks.
  • Mike-
    Welcome aboard! Looks like you're well on your way. Brett provided sound advice: get tools with stiffer bristles. I have a box of "graining tools" that I like to use. Specifically, a pipe brush:
    pipebrush

    a file cleaner brush (a file card):
    filecard
    and a brush from the welding department at the hardware store:

    weldingbrush

    If the wire brushes you're using look kind of like a toothbrush, you'll scrub a LOT harder and get minimal results:

    welder-scratch-brush-plastic-handle

    For those looking for that scratch pen, make sure you buy one that has steel bristles as opposed to fiberglass. This is the one I have:
    https://tinyurl.com/y842jybq

    With knot holes, I keep a bunch of awls, scribers, or picks handy depending on what I want to achieve. Some came from the beading section of the hobby store (I think they call them "beading picks"). Others from the hardware store and some came from my dentist. I just asked him for his old "scalers" and he gave me a few. I'll also use these tools to scribe some deeper grain lines into boards:

    picks

    Hope that helps!
  • I believe the one from Amazon costing 8.72 is fiber glass not metal. The metal (steel) one is also a EuroTool Germany BRS-292-00 Scratch Brush Steel Bristles.
    24.39. I believe i got my steel EuroTool from Micro Mark.
    ed
  • dang...the one I ordered is fiberglass but I just re-ordered the steel bristled one
  • Great to see you working up your O'Neills 1:87...such a nice kit. Will be following along closely. I put my knot holes in after I grain and stain the wood, which allows me to detail the knot holes as needed. Your wood coloring looks great and a perfect base for the "peeling paint" effect you will be doing. Well done. Ken
  • If you ordered a fiberglass scratch pen, hold on to it. You won't find it very helpful for distressing wood but I believe it'll come in handy for peeling paint effects.
  • KKarns said:

    Great to see you working up your O'Neills 1:87...such a nice kit. Will be following along closely. I put my knot holes in after I grain and stain the wood, which allows me to detail the knot holes as needed. Your wood coloring looks great and a perfect base for the "peeling paint" effect you will be doing. Well done. Ken

    Thanks Ken, your posts have been very inspirational for me, including getting me to get my own Blue Sky kit. I just went over your forum build on this kit, and your wood clinic because I was still struggling with the knot holes.
    20180114_085135-600x1067

    This is the result of round two of knot holes with the tools I used and a small drop of AI on them.
  • That wood looks wonderful Mike, well done!
  • Thanks Brett! I still can't help but wonder if I have the knot holes right, at best it's more of a vague impression of them in my eyes, but I don't want them overdone either lol. I definitely makes a difference when your looking at one individual board, and when you lay them next to each other.
  • Good job Mike. Coloring is excellent.
    ed
  • Mike Very nice. ....Carl
  • Looks great Mike. You're off to a real good start.

    I tried to use one of the fiberglass brushes to rough things up years ago. It didn't work very well but worse than that it ended up shedding some real sharp, clear bristles into the skin of my hands. It was from a tool kit I inherited so it may have been very old by the time I got it.

    I use the round pipe cleaner style that Bill had in his first example mainly. I got one at Home Depot or Lowes for a few dollars. I have a whole drawer full of wire brushes but that one is the one I use most. Expensive doesn't really equal effectiveness for this tool, I ordered every wire brush Snap-On Tools offered and they were mostly crimped brushes that didn't work every well.

    -Steve

  • Steve, You are correct, when I sold Snap-On-Tools they they had no hobby section. Probably don't have one now. But many could be used in our hobby. Just not the wire brush's.
    How can one not tackle the receiver?
    ed
  • So little steps forward..... started the damp brushing technique illustrated in the manual, and shown on the main site. When I got the bottle of Ivory paint I was a little learyy, as it seemed to have an aweful lot of yellow in the bottle. When I started damp brushing I was glad to see that it seemed to lose a lot of that and dry up a lighter shade almost white, but with a good amount of cream to it.

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  • Looks great Mike, just right. I love the way the details popped - like the knots and grain.
  • Well done, Mike
    ed
  • I echo what Brett said about the details coming out. Looks like you got some real nice variation. Nicely done.
  • Mike, looks excellent.

    Geezerbill
  • Thanks guys, the next update is a little delayed, I had the wrong white craft paint, so need to plan a trip to get some lol!
  • edited January 25
    if i'm doing larger 'outdoor' timbers (like the 1/8" square) i start with the file card, then the pipe brush, then the smaller steel or brass brushes. i usually skip the file card for most other boards. i think detailing the boards is my favorite part of the build. your boards look great!
  • Mike,
    The wood is fantastic. The peel is awesome. It will definitely define your build. Great job
    Jim
  • Sneak peek on the window and door frames. Again wasn't sure about the bluegrass green, but once mixed, toned down a tiny bit with chalk, and butted up against the Ivory.... wow, what a combo! Good job boss!20180127_222945-600x1067
  • Very nice contrast. I like it.
    ed
  • Really does work...Nice fit and finish.
  • I don't get much time to work on this, and when I do, it seems like I take hours doing the simplest tasks. The break from the daily grind at work is why I tend to go slowly. That and I'm still learning soooo much.....

    Another pic to show my forward progress...



    20180210_020109-600x1067
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