visit sierrawestscalemodels.com

Dirt, Details & Dioramas

1356

Comments

  • Another woodland scenics product I like to use is the "Fine leaf foliage"

    image

    Picking off selected branch sections can result in some very nice fine shrubbery.

    image

    These look great poking through as if growing in the details...

    image

    Now that these main rough layers are done I will move on to the next small section and repeat the process.

    image

    More later....

    Karl.A
  • edited February 2013
    Second fenceline starts off basically the same as the first one explained....

    It's kind of strange going back and seeing these barren old photos now that the dio is basically complete next to me.

    image

    image

    image

    I have always felt that good scenery is full of variety. Nature itself is extremely varied, colours, textures, sizes.
    I try to use as many different items as possible in order to create the illusion of natural diversity.
    I also try to imagine where things and how things would naturally grow. More dense shrubbery away from traffic, larger growth in protected/neglected areas, a small tuft of grass peeking between items that rarely get disturbed.
    As with all aspects of modelling I look to the real world for guidance and ideas.

    Various colours and shapes of caspia and othe dried flowers from Michaels, WalMart, similar.

    image

    image

    image

    Dried floral moss for grinding up.

    image

    image

    Scenic express grass tufts, various colours

    image

    As with details, I try to keep the colours muted and stay away from bright greens or yellows.

    As stated previously I think about each placement, poke a hole with a nail and 'plant' a weed. It takes time but building slowly starting with the small items and moving up in size can give very nice results I think.

    Karl.A

  • The ruts in the dirt road were added with the handle of a pair of scissors.
    I havent done the tractor tracks in the driveway yet but will add them to the thread when I do.

    image

    I guess there's not much else to do but post some overall pictures.

    If theres any questions or anything I missed that you wanted to see just ask, I probably have pictures of it.

    Karl.A
  • Overall pictures.....

    image

    Karl.A
  • Fantastic.... learning so much.
  • Still loving this thread.....Karl your work is a true inspiration.
  • Thanks for this thread , I'm new to the hobby and find this thread very helpful. Ive already printed it off and saved it for future use.
  • Karl you are a true master builder.

    Thank you for taking the time to show us your process step by step. A class like this that we didnt even have to pay for is what makes this forum so great.

    The overall shots are great too. :)
  • The scene looks very natural and your techniques are effective and simple to reproduce. Will you be hanging the overalls on the clothes line?
  • Thanks for the great comments guys, much appreciated.

    Here are some real overall shots. everything was done using the methods outlined in this thread.

    Karl.A

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image
  • Top drawer again Karl.
  • Clear documentation and superb execution resulting in a tremendously informative reference - Thanks for sharing your talents and expertise!
  • Ill sum this up in 6 words.

    SUPERB, FANTATSIC, BRILLIANT, MIND BLOWINGLY BEAUTIFUL
  • I'll second that Wes. GREAT ! Thanks for sharring your talents with us.
  • Hi Karl,

    Wow! Everything is superb and pleasing to the eye. Thank you for doing this build and teaching us. The natural uses of dried plants have expanded my understanding of how to build a diorama.

    I have 3 questions.

    1.What is your sequence of painting the resin boxes (they look just like I would expect a real wood box would look like out in the weather)?
    2.When you rust a metal casting what color mixes of chalk are you using?
    3. Is there anything special you are doing to blend the chalk over a metal casting to create rust (like the tractor) to give it a natural look?

    Thanks again!!!

    Jim
  • Thanks for all the great comments guys, I'm really glad that you found the information useful and maybe gave you a few ideas.
    Scenery is really easy to practice on any scrap surface to experiment with effects and styles.

    Karl.A
  • Thanks for the kind comment and your questions Jim.

    1. Wooden boxes are spray primed with Krylon Khaki in a rattle can. They are then coloured with a base chalk and alcohol when dry. A final dry brushing of light grey makes them look aged and faded.

    2. The only colour chalk I use for rust is Rembrandt 411.3. Dusted and dabbed with a soft brush over the blackened metal. No fixative.

    3. For something like the tractor the metal parts were all blackened and then painted solid yellow. The yellow was then chipped off with a toothpick and/or fingernail. Rust chalk was applied only to the chipped areas with a fine detail brush dry, any excess is lightly blown of. This will give you the effect you see.

    Karl.A
  • Karl, A few pics back, I swear I can't tell where your diorama stops and the real outdoors begins. It's seamless and absolutely stunning. Your photography is equally ridiculous, when I look at those shots I feel like I could walk right into the scene and pick that stuff up. Can of Krylon Khaki...geesh...I need a can of Krylon Karl to spray all over my workbench!
  • Wonderful work, Karl. The realism in those outdoor shots is jaw dropping.
    Subtle color and rich textures: two staples of SW construction executed flawlessly with scenery materials.
    I hope to see this in person this year!
  • Wow fantastic modeling. I have learned so much, thank you for sharing it for us.
    Stevo In OZ
  • Thanks so much Ken, Bill and Stevo. much appreciated.

    I will have the dio at the Expo later this year Bill, hopefully see you there.

    Karl.A
  • edited February 2013
    If we don't get buried in the snow getting to the Expo...
  • Mike,

    I am using Polyblend sanded grout available from HomeDepot or similar though the brand shouldnt make any difference.

    The colours I am using are Linen ---- basically an off white
    and Summer Wheat ----- a light brown.

    My base layer is made up from a dry blend of 1 part Summer Wheat to two parts Linen.

    Karl.A
    Hi Karl,

    Sorry for not asking earlier but, would you recommend using grout for HO scale? The texture you have created seems quite appropriate for O scale, but might seem a bit coarse for HO? Is this more related to application or with the product? Also, you use 'sanded' grout as opposed to 'non-sanded'. Is this because of issues associated with shrinkage? Or more so for added texture? Or something else all together?

    I may be asking a bit much of you in this regard and maybe I should just get out and experiment. But, I thought, it might not hurt to ask. Thanks in-advance.

    sfc
  • Hi Scott,
    no problem, and infact your question is one that I have been thinking about recently myself.
    Working mostly in O scale I do like the texture that the sanded grout gives, and also the texture variation you can achieve.
    It can be applied several ways for differing results.

    The top line basics..
    Sprinkled on between a finger and thumb will give a coarser texture.
    Sifted on will give an even layer which still retains the sanded texture.
    Rubbing the dried and fixed grout layer with a fingertip will release the sand grains and result in a smoother surface, such as a pathway.
    Adding extra moisture and leveling the grout while wet (sloppy) will result in a smoother surface.

    I have used the same mix on O, HO and even N dios with good results.

    However, for the past year or so I have been intending to buy some unsanded grout to experiment with for smooth areas and smaller scales, I just keep forgetting to pick it up at the store. Heck I'm only at HomeDepot 5 or 6 times a week.....!!

    I'll make a point of getting some unsanded this week and let you know, I cant imagine shrinkage will be a problem. I'll post an update on how it works out.

    Karl.A
  • What about mixing unsanded grout with something of a finer grit? Perhaps something like the finer grits used for sandblasting?
Sign In or Register to comment.